Projects
Giovanni Vetere
Giovanni Vetere

In 1964, Jacques Yves Cousteau conceived the theory of the Homo Aquaticus, describing a future evolution of the human species capable of living underwater. Squid Dinner invites anyone who accepts the risks and dangers of entering an unfamiliar landscape and requires the spectator to become aware of his own abilities of adaptation. Curiosity and mindfulness are necessary during this journey in which water runs its course in a rocky desert. By culminating in the actual demonstration of Cousteau’s theories, utopia is abandoned in favour of a forthcoming reality.


A social construct, such as dinner, can become a performative ritual able to transmit core values of society and implant beliefs and customs such as religion, patriarchy, and social hierarchy. Squid Dinner, becomes agentive insofar as it enacts change in the world and refects on pressing political, social and scientifc issues. How, then, can performance embody ecological awareness? Squid Dinner presents a concept of nature that undermines traditional aesthetic notions of ‘the sublime.’ While the power of nature was perceived from a safe distance in the mind of the viewer, today, in the face of global climate shifts, there is no safe distance from which to view nature. Giovanni Vetere’s practice directly puts to the test the public’s awareness of the environment and their ability to adapt to new climates. The exhibition challenges the public to embrace an unusual landscape, triggering tension between their ability to adapt and their willingness to do so. While provoking their state of sensorial awareness, the exhibition compels the public to discover a new meaning of adaptation in respect to the natural environment.


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In 1964, Jacques Yves Cousteau conceived the theory of the Homo Aquaticus, describing a future evolution of the human species capable of living underwater. Squid Dinner invites anyone who accepts the risks and dangers of entering an unfamiliar landscape and requires the spectator to become aware of his own abilities of adaptation. Curiosity and mindfulness are necessary during this journey in which water runs its course in a rocky desert. By culminating in the actual demonstration of Cousteau’s theories, utopia is abandoned in favour of a forthcoming reality.


A social construct, such as dinner, can become a performative ritual able to transmit core values of society and implant beliefs and customs such as religion, patriarchy, and social hierarchy. Squid Dinner, becomes agentive insofar as it enacts change in the world and refects on pressing political, social and scientifc issues. How, then, can performance embody ecological awareness? Squid Dinner presents a concept of nature that undermines traditional aesthetic notions of ‘the sublime.’ While the power of nature was perceived from a safe distance in the mind of the viewer, today, in the face of global climate shifts, there is no safe distance from which to view nature. Giovanni Vetere’s practice directly puts to the test the public’s awareness of the environment and their ability to adapt to new climates. The exhibition challenges the public to embrace an unusual landscape, triggering tension between their ability to adapt and their willingness to do so. While provoking their state of sensorial awareness, the exhibition compels the public to discover a new meaning of adaptation in respect to the natural environment.


Read more...

 
× Squid Dinner Hanging Palm and Bleached Coral Portrait of the Homo Aquaticus Drowned in Living Waters Bodies of Water Shipwreck with Spectator I took your picture from the water Leap Into the Ocean Right or Wrong I am Still the Captain Henry the Lobster No One is Looking at You Ipogeo SP(L)IT All I See is Blue